Category: Ingredients

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Saturday, 15 December, 2012

Alpine Bistort

Thrives in Arctic highlands, the alpine bistort is commonly found in the Alps and Tibetan Plateau, to name a few. It has a thick rootstock, and grows up to 15 cm in height. The flower, which grows in abundance, takes 3-4 years to reach maturity, and its starchy bulbils are favoured by the Rock Ptarmigan, a medium sized gamebird.

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Trifoliate orange

Widely used in traditional Chinese medicine, most especially in treating allergic inflammation. Thought to contain anti-allergic, anti-tumour and anti-viral qualities, and also useful in treating or preventing gastric attacks.

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Pontederia cordata

More commonly known as Pickerel weed, the monocotyledonous aquatic plant is a native of the Americas. Thrives in a variety of wetlands, such as ponds, lakes and rivers. Blooms in late summer, featuring purple flowers with yellow markings, which are thought to attract bees.

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Common Purslane

Outside the US, where it is considered a noxious weed, purslane is eaten in a variety of cuisines around the world. Used in traditional Chinese medicine where it is known as Ma Chi Xian, the herb is clinically effective in treating oral lichen planus, while its leaves alleviate venomous bites, boils, sores, bee stings, among others. 

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African Bush

Known as spekboom in Afrikaans, the African Bush is a popular indoor bonsai and a robust xeriscaping plant. Its drought-tolerant and fire-resistant qualities make it an excellent survivor of the unforgiving African climate.

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Portulaca pilosa

Used in traditional Brazilian medicine to induce diuresis, antipyresis and analgesia. Studies show renal effects upon consumption; especially in rats, such extracts show an increase in potassium excretion without other bodily changes. 

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Cowslip

A native to European and Asian climates, cowslip is used in traditional Spanish cooking as a salad green. In English cuisine, the flowers are used in flavouring country wine and vinegars.

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Primrose

A native of European climates, the flower is occasionally known as the English Primrose. Both its flowers and leaves can be eaten, and are thought to resemble a cross between a lettuce and bitter salad greens in taste. Primrose is used to make tea or wine.

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Kerguelen cabbage

Its high potassium content makes it extremely nutritious. As a flowering plant in the Brassicaceae family, the plant is related to the cabbage. A popular vegetable for sailors, supposedly as a strong deterrent against scurvy.

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Pteris ensiformis

A common ingredient in Taiwanese herbal drinks. Native to African and Asian tropics, as well as the Pacific.

POSTED BY Food Lab AT GMT +8 3:10pm | No Comments
CATEGORIES: Ingredients